Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

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In2ition
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by In2ition » Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:30 pm

https://www.azcentral.com/story/sports/ ... 493774002/

The Suns need to have the practice facility within Phoenix city limits, but they want it closer to Scottsdale where most of the players have homes. Here's my best guess, they put it near the Mayo Clinic in North Phoenix close to Scottsdale Rd., and have it somewhat sponsored by them too.
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by bajanguy008 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:59 pm

anyone subscribed to the Athletic to post this article ? :oops:

https://theathletic.com/864629/2019/04/ ... big-board/
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by ShelC » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:02 pm

Are we allowed to? I wanted to post it but didn't want the site to get in trouble.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by bajanguy008 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:16 pm

ShelC wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:02 pm
Are we allowed to? I wanted to post it but didn't want the site to get in trouble.
oh my bad then, you might have a valid point there
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Superbone » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:29 pm

bajanguy008 wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:16 pm
ShelC wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:02 pm
Are we allowed to? I wanted to post it but didn't want the site to get in trouble.
oh my bad then, you might have a valid point there
I think we can post excerpts.
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Superbone » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:38 pm

bajanguy008 wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:59 pm
anyone subscribed to the Athletic to post this article ? :oops:

https://theathletic.com/864629/2019/04/ ... big-board/
But here’s the thing: I actually don’t think this core is that far off of being complete. The Suns are a really bad basketball team, but there are an awful lot of interesting pieces on the roster. They’re just young and still figuring things out. They have two legitimate building blocks signed to long-term contracts. They have a few interesting wings who look like potential starting caliber players. They have cap space this summer. To top it off, they’re likely to end up with a top-five pick that will potentially complete the core of players they’ve already accumulated.

In some ways, this situation is somewhat idiot-proof. The core is in place, they just have to fill in around the seams. But then again, if there is an organization that can screw it up, it’s the current iteration of the Suns...
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by bajanguy008 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:50 pm

Superbone wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:38 pm
bajanguy008 wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:59 pm
anyone subscribed to the Athletic to post this article ? :oops:

https://theathletic.com/864629/2019/04/ ... big-board/
But here’s the thing: I actually don’t think this core is that far off of being complete. The Suns are a really bad basketball team, but there are an awful lot of interesting pieces on the roster. They’re just young and still figuring things out. They have two legitimate building blocks signed to long-term contracts. They have a few interesting wings who look like potential starting caliber players. They have cap space this summer. To top it off, they’re likely to end up with a top-five pick that will potentially complete the core of players they’ve already accumulated.

In some ways, this situation is somewhat idiot-proof. The core is in place, they just have to fill in around the seams. But then again, if there is an organization that can screw it up, it’s the current iteration of the Suns...
ok understood
thanks tho
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by ShelC » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:54 pm

Did my best picking out the juiciest stuff....it's a super long article and very well done by Vecenie. Hope it's not too much:
Ayton:

It would also help him to develop more as a facilitator out of the post himself, although he has taken real strides there already this season. His 1-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio is a good sign, but he’s not really making advanced passes on the move. It’s not the worst thing in the world for a center, but in an era of perimeter-based play, it would help Ayton to be able to put the ball on the deck more confidently going forward when facing the basket, as opposed to using it to get to his step-back jumper or when his back is to the basket. The dribble hand-off hasn’t really been a big part of Ayton’s role, but Ayton’s power and mobility would seemingly play up in such scenarios if he could become more comfortable as a handler.

The second concern people have is about his defense. It’s worth noting that I’ve always been a bit less concerned there than most, but early in the season he struggled even beyond what I expected. The full season numbers are ugly. He’s still not exactly natural rotating across the paint. Offensive players are finishing around him like there’s basically no one contesting. Opponents made 64.9 percent of their shots that Ayton contested at the basket, which is 57th out of 60 centers to defend at least 150 shots at the basket this season according to Second Spectrum data. Early in the season, he just had no idea how to use his length to affect shots inside. Some guys instinctively know how when to help, and know when passing angles close down for guards. Ayton doesn’t really fit that billing. It often leads to him being stuck in no-man’s land. He also has a propensity to get on his heels as opposed to staying on the toes of his feet, which forces him to take an extra step to gather back onto his toes and results in him either mistiming leaps or generating less explosiveness.

But he’s shown the kind of improvement throughout the course of the season that you hope to see from rookie big men, and there’s real room for upside. He’s already a good perimeter defender for a center, capable of taking on tough assignments on bigger forwards like Giannis Antetokounmpo and LeBron James. His footwork is kind of a mess right now — as you see in the video above — but he can cut down the number of useless steps he takes just as he gets comfortable in the NBA. Overall, he’s held up pretty well away from the basket, given that he’s faced more pick-and-rolls than all but 10 big defenders according to Synergy.


Booker:

But here’s the other thing: he’s improving elsewhere beyond the scoring, too. The best place we see that is in Booker’s playmaking for others. When the Kentucky product entered the league, he was a fine playmaker who got a majority of his assists kicking out after attacking closeouts. Now, Booker is comfortable running an offense for spurts, reading and reacting to the way defenses react to him slithering through ball-screens and stringing out defenders,

That Booker is doing all of this on an above-average true-shooting percentage while only shooting 32.8 percent from 3 and being Phoenix one true perimeter ball-handler is a scary sign for the league, given what we know about his prodigious shooting ability. Once he gets a chance to play off the ball and get more open catch-and-shoot 3s, that number is going to skyrocket. Sure, the defense needs to improve. For the Suns to hit the next level and become even passable on that end of the floor, it would help if their leader — ultimately what Booker has become — would take more of an interest in defense. It’s possible that once the Suns start to compete, his effort level improves on that end.

Still, I think it’s hard to feel negative about what Booker has become. Getting him under a full five-year max last offseason with no options was undeniably a win for the Suns.

Bridges:
He does a good job making the lives of NBA stars harder with his length, but he’s not quite a shutdown guy yet. He can’t make this defense good on his own. Very few players in the NBA have that ability. But he’s the kind of player the Suns need to keep accumulating if the team wants to turn around its porous play on that side of the floor. He’s a magnet for the ball, as his 3.3 deflections per 36 minutes rank him in the top 20 in the NBA, and his ability to recover after getting beaten is top-notch due to his length. Still, there are little techniques he needs to learn. He’ll get lost and occasionally gamble off the ball, and he fell victim to elite catch-and-shoot players at times this season. He also hasn’t quite figured out the dark art of navigating ball-screens by the best centers in the NBA. Sometimes he’ll go too far under the screen and get caught assuming that his length can allow him to recover. Other times, he’ll just get caught up in the screen. These are the little things he’ll improve at as he learns the NBA game. For the most part, he’s a positive out there on defense.

The bigger question I have is on offense, where Bridges has been inconsistent this season after two years at Villanova of being a knockdown, 42 percent 3-point shooter on 351 attempts. The key to Bridges’ worth as an offensive player, indeed, revolves around that jump shot. He’s not a high-level creator. Mostly, you want him filling lanes in transition and sitting in spot-up opportunities either in the corner or at the break.

Oubre:
It’s also worth noting that we saw some expanded responsibilities in Phoenix that Oubre just didn’t get a chance to showcase in Washington. He’s still mostly an advantage scorer who likes to attack off of the bounce when he receives the ball in a spot-up opportunity, but he showed some potential as a pick-and-roll ball-handler late in the season for Phoenix as a creator. His wiggle off the bounce has improved since being drafted, and it allows him to either slither around the lane while looking for an open shot at the basket, or the ability to gain separation for a step-back.

However, his typically inconsistent 3-point shooting transferred over to Phoenix with him, as he only knocked down 32.5 percent from 3. Similarly, Oubre still isn’t at the stage where he can be relied upon as a steady defender. He’s legitimately good on the ball, but will get lost off ball, and is a consistent gambler who tries to get into passing lanes to create transition opportunities. Because of these inconsistencies, it’s still fair to question whether or not he’s worth the heavy money he’s likely to seek in free agency, given the number of teams with cap space and his career year.

Jackson:

Jackson is one of the toughest assets in the NBA to judge right now. His sophomore season was markedly similar to his rookie season, both in terms of outline and production. Much like 2017-18, Jackson started out poorly before coming on and showing flashes late in the season, when the Suns were already eliminated and the team was largely experimenting with its pieces. His true-shooting percentage rose by 0.7 points to a still-paltry 48.7 percent. His rebounding rate remained stagnant. His assist-to-turnover rate was similarly close to the one-to-one mark that you don’t really want from perimeter players. Defensively, he showcased many of the high-energy, on-ball positives that saw him drafted at No. 4, but also consistently got lost off ball.

The numbers aren’t great, but an additional issue is that everything is a roller coaster. He has games where looks like a future high-level starter, possessing the type of competitive mindset that you want to put next to Devin Booker long-term. Out of all the guys on the team, he’s the one who seems to have the best offensive chemistry with Ayton. But all too often that desire to compete is combined with mind-boggling mental errors that just can’t happen. Furthermore, his maturity just hasn’t improved, with a failed appearance at a grocery store back in late February resulting in further organizational embarrassment in the midst of a bad season.

The problem the Suns have now is that they have to make a very real decision on his fourth-year option early next year. At $8.93 million for the 2020-21 season, it’s not exactly a typical rookie contract.

Given what we’ve seen so far, I’d gauge the market on Jackson and potentially look to move him. What I’d look for in such a deal is dependent upon how active the team figures to be in free agency, and how successful they are on NBA Draft Lottery night. The team has a route to clearing max-level cap space if it wants to, so maybe moving him for future assets makes sense. Or, could they decide to do something of a one-for-one deal? If the Raptors lose Kawhi Leonard this summer and look to re-tool, could the Suns maybe do a Jackson for Fred Van Vleet swap to give them more positional value? Could he be part of a bigger swap for Mike Conley if the Suns decide to fill their point guard hole that way? It figures to be an interesting summer for Jackson.

Warren and Johnson:
Warren and Johnson are unquestionably NBA-level players who can help good teams off the bench. And to be frank, Warren might be a little bit more than that if his shooting from this season continues into the future. After spending his first four years as a 28 percent 3-point shooter who hit only 79 shots from distance in 218 games, Warren made 77 3s at a 42.8 percent clip in just 43 games this season. It was one of the most shocking skill improvements in the entire league this season.

After long being more of a midrange/floater killer that was difficult to place easily into the flow of an offense because he needed to handle the ball to create plays, Warren’s skill set is now much more easily defined if he can keep knocking down shots directly off the catch. While his typical inclination is still to try to isolate his defender and score, it’s easier to tell him that he needs to focus more on being a cog in an offense instead of the offense itself — especially once he gets in a situation with more talent that is ready to win around him.

Part of the issue is that he’s not a particularly adept passer, with his uncommonly low 7.7 percent assist rate this season representing a career high. It also doesn’t help that he’s not much of a defender, either. But if the shooting is real and the Suns can add offensive players around him, I think there is a lot of hope that Warren can be an effective role player for a winner. He’s still only 25. Having said that, I’m not sure I’d want to pay both Oubre and Warren a combined $20-25 million per season — especially when Warren’s propensity for little injuries has resulted in him never playing more than 66 games in a season. That makes him prime trade fodder, as we’ll discuss later.

At the very least, Johnson was an adult for a Suns’ backcourt that needed one. The Mose Schrute of the NBA isn’t exactly the world’s most creative playmaker, but he threw up a 4-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio for a team that finished 29th in the NBA in turnover rate. The issue was that he shot it extremely poorly, only hitting 36.8 percent from the field and 32 percent from 3. But if only for positional value, it made more sense to have him on the roster than Ryan Anderson, the man the Suns traded for Johnson. Honestly, it probably made more sense to have Johnson than Brandon Knight, too, if we want to stretch it back to the original player Anderson was dealt for. He’s a useful option off the bench. Now, Johnson is slated to make $19.2 million next season, a ridiculously large number for what he will provide. But I’m not so sure that teams won’t see him as something of an interesting asset around deadline time if they so want to clear out cap space.

Bender and Holmes:
The Croatian simply hasn’t shown enough to prove that he can play on the NBA level yet. He plays smart, but he just doesn’t yet possess the skills or athleticism to play on the floor, due in large part to his lack of shooting. He’s still only 21 years old, though, so there’s room for growth. The Suns made the call to decline his fourth-year rookie scale contract option, making him an unrestricted free agent. No team will pay him the $5.9 million that the Suns have the ability to pay up to, meaning the team could look to bring him back on a smaller deal. To me, he’s a minimum scale deal flyer for someone to take, but it wouldn’t surprise me if a team pays something like $5 million total for two years with a second year team option to take a shot on him. Phoenix should keep his hold on the books until they have something better to use it on, but expect him to depart.

Holmes is the best actual player on this list outside of Oubre, an undersized, offensively-inclined center who puts pressure on the rim due to his timing and leaping ability. He’s also an energy giver on a team that desperately needs guys who provide some passion. Imagine him as something of a poor man’s Montrezl Harrell, a role that has legitimate value in today’s NBA in small doses. It’s also easy to imagine Holmes looking better with more of a facilitator point guard. For instance, I don’t think it’s an accident that the team actually had a positive net rating in minutes with both Holmes and Okobo on the floor, and only had a negative-2 net rating with Holmes and Melton on the floor. He had a 70 true-shooting percentage with Melton on the floor, and a 66.5 percentage with Okobo. If the Suns can get a real point guard, I think it makes sense to bring back Holmes on a deal similar to what Kyle O’Quinn signed in New York, a four-year, $16 million deal with an option attached at the end. I don’t think bidding should get much higher than that, given how many bigs will hit free agency this summer. But remember, Holmes is an unrestricted free agent, so the Suns do not hold the cards here.

Capspace:
Without question, I would keep Oubre’s cap hold on the books, and try to re-sign him. Given that his cap hold is slightly under $10 million and Oubre projects to have a salary greater than $10 million in his first season, there is surplus value to be had by the Suns front office. They can come to terms on an agreement, then file the deal with the league office later in order to get maximum use out of their cap space.

I’d try to re-sign Holmes and hang on to his cap hold for as long as I could to provide surplus value, but he’s unrestricted, meaning he can sign anywhere.

First, plenty of teams have cap space this summer, and the Warren contract is pretty easily moveable. Could a team look to take on Warren into its cap space? Maybe it would see Warren as a type of free agency signing to upgrade its scoring depth at a price tag of three years, $35.2 million. It’s a slight overpay given his injury history, but it’s not a bad contract, either. Or, maybe they look to move Jackson for a future asset, thus clearing $7 million off of its books.

Draft:
If the Suns end up selecting outside of the top-two, I would seriously consider a trade. The team needs a point guard, followed by defensive play, followed by more shooting in terms of its need allocation. Particularly, it could be interesting for the team to explore a deal. If they land at No. 5, for instance, I think there’s a real case to be made that the team could make a move for Mike Conley involving Tyler Johnson, T.J. Warren, and that pick. Typically, I tend to err on the side of wanting cost-controlled assets and more team contract control as a philosophy, but the Suns have the outline of their rebuild already built with Booker, Ayton, Bridges, and more. They actually could be in the position where fast-tracking the rebuild, getting competent, winning pieces around those youngsters, and having them actually compete for something is the better play. Also, remember, the No. 5 pick in this draft isn’t a typical top-five pick in terms of talent/certainty. Or simply, if they end up in the 3-to-5 range, they could also look to move down into the 7-to-10 range, and look to target a point guard like Coby White as opposed to another position.

Zion:
Williamson should be the No. 1 guy on everyone’s board. He’s clearly the best player in the draft in terms of production, efficiency, translatability, and everything along with it. But even with that said, I think his fit with the Suns is terrific. Particularly, he’s the kind of player who could really bring their young core into a different realm defensively. Additionally, I also love his offensive fit with Ayton if the team can find a competent, distribution-conscious point guard to play with them. That pairing would give the Suns two guys who put immense pressure on the rim both in the halfcourt and in transition. Williamson’s ability to drive the basketball is basically spacing-proof, as he showed this season at Duke surrounded by next-to-none of it. Realistically, the team would only need one of he or Ayton figuring out how to shoot the basketball — and both have the potential to do so at some point.

Ja:
Sources around the NBA are buzzing that Morant is actually the player the Suns prefer to end up with. Particularly, Jones is thought to be a fan of the dynamic lead guard. It’s not a surprise, given their need at the point guard position. But color me skeptical that the team would actually take him at No. 1. The financial windfall any team figures to experience by selecting Williamson is real.

Still, Morant would be a great consolation prize for the Suns if they end up at No. 2. He’s an elite level athlete in terms of quickness, with unbelievable ability off of a live dribble. He’s a shot creator from any circumstance, both for himself and others. His ability to pass from every angle and run pick-and-roll with big men would mesh perfectly with Ayton, Bridges and Booker. He’d also push Booker off the ball more often, allowing him to get more chances for open shots by running off of the ball. But the other aspect I’d mention about Morant is that he’s also terrific at playing away from the ball to start possessions, if the Suns wanted to use Booker as a primary handler at times. Basically, if the Suns end up with a top-two pick, they can’t go wrong.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Superbone » Fri Apr 19, 2019 6:53 pm

Did you know we went 8-13 after the all-star break? Much better than I remember.
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Ring_Wanted » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:54 am

I just read som guy call Jared Dudley 'Fat Grant Hill' and I am rolling hahahahh

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by INFORMER » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:03 pm

Fitzgerald, of course, has a relationship with Suns owner Robert Sarver.

“He’s drastically misunderstood. I love Mr. Sarver,” Fitzgerald said of Sarver in December. “I spent a lot of time with him. I can’t think of anybody who I trust more than him. He’s one of those guys, he’ll look you in your eye, he’ll shake your hand. He would go out of his way to help anybody he knows. Once you know him … it’s easy to love him.”

Fitzgerald went on to say Monday “nobody gets to see him like I see him.”

The 35-year-old was also with Sarver and other members of the front office in March to watch likely top-3 pick Ja Morant out of Murray State.
http://arizonasports.com/story/1919830/ ... nterviews/
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by SDC » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:54 pm

he's angling for a front office job after his retirement?

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by SDC » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:55 pm

Superbone wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 6:53 pm
Did you know we went 8-13 after the all-star break? Much better than I remember.
yeah, and booker went on a scoring binge too and raised his shooting efficiency.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by ShelC » Thu Apr 25, 2019 4:23 am

Knowing someone socially and working for/with them are two different things.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by O_Gardino » Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:15 am

INFORMER wrote:
Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:03 pm
Fitzgerald, of course, has a relationship with Suns owner Robert Sarver.

“He’s drastically misunderstood. I love Mr. Sarver,” Fitzgerald said of Sarver in December. “I spent a lot of time with him. I can’t think of anybody who I trust more than him. He’s one of those guys, he’ll look you in your eye, he’ll shake your hand. He would go out of his way to help anybody he knows. Once you know him … it’s easy to love him.”

Fitzgerald went on to say Monday “nobody gets to see him like I see him.”

The 35-year-old was also with Sarver and other members of the front office in March to watch likely top-3 pick Ja Morant out of Murray State.
http://arizonasports.com/story/1919830/ ... nterviews/
He shakes hands?! So special!

Real talk, though. This is the kind of thing people say about addicts before they see the destructive side.
SELL THE TEAM
#notank
#sarverout

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by The Bobster » Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:53 am

Hey Larry, maybe you see a different side of him because you're a celebrity?
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Indy » Thu Apr 25, 2019 7:55 am

The Bobster wrote:
Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:53 am
Hey Larry, maybe you see a different side of him because you're a celebrity?
And don't work for him, and are in a position to help him.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Superbone » Thu Apr 25, 2019 9:00 am

Jerrod Mustaf article. From possible murderer to community hero.

https://www.si.com/nba/2019/04/17/jerro ... ity-leader
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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by JeremyG » Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:57 am

O_Gardino wrote:
Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:15 am
INFORMER wrote:
Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:03 pm
Fitzgerald, of course, has a relationship with Suns owner Robert Sarver.

“He’s drastically misunderstood. I love Mr. Sarver,” Fitzgerald said of Sarver in December. “I spent a lot of time with him. I can’t think of anybody who I trust more than him. He’s one of those guys, he’ll look you in your eye, he’ll shake your hand. He would go out of his way to help anybody he knows. Once you know him … it’s easy to love him.”

Fitzgerald went on to say Monday “nobody gets to see him like I see him.”

The 35-year-old was also with Sarver and other members of the front office in March to watch likely top-3 pick Ja Morant out of Murray State.
http://arizonasports.com/story/1919830/ ... nterviews/
He shakes hands?! So special!

Real talk, though. This is the kind of thing people say about addicts before they see the destructive side.
I think he meant that in relation to the part about trusting him...in other words, he looks you in the eye and shakes your hand, and you can trust him to do what he told you he would do.

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Re: Suns News: Week 26 4/8-4/9

Post by Indy » Thu Apr 25, 2019 11:04 am

JeremyG wrote:
Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:57 am
O_Gardino wrote:
Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:15 am
INFORMER wrote:
Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:03 pm
Fitzgerald, of course, has a relationship with Suns owner Robert Sarver.

“He’s drastically misunderstood. I love Mr. Sarver,” Fitzgerald said of Sarver in December. “I spent a lot of time with him. I can’t think of anybody who I trust more than him. He’s one of those guys, he’ll look you in your eye, he’ll shake your hand. He would go out of his way to help anybody he knows. Once you know him … it’s easy to love him.”

Fitzgerald went on to say Monday “nobody gets to see him like I see him.”

The 35-year-old was also with Sarver and other members of the front office in March to watch likely top-3 pick Ja Morant out of Murray State.
http://arizonasports.com/story/1919830/ ... nterviews/
He shakes hands?! So special!

Real talk, though. This is the kind of thing people say about addicts before they see the destructive side.
I think he meant that in relation to the part about trusting him...in other words, he looks you in the eye and shakes your hand, and you can trust him to do what he told you he would do.
Interesting because people that work for him don't say you can trust him.

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